Review: ‘Savior’ by Martha Kennedy

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Review of ‘Savior’ by Martha Kennedy

Historical novels are not my usual choice, but this novel immersed me back in the time of knights and crusaders in the C13th. The protagonist, Rudolph, a young Swiss man is suffering from depression. He believes Satan has claimed his soul and the only way to rid him-self from this dilemma is to travel by horse to the Holy Land where he hopes to end his life fighting for the religion he’s lost touch with. He leaves behind his beautiful fiancé.

Rudolph travels with his younger brother, Conrad, who is full of life and hope. Rudolph has much to learn and the story follows his journey of finding himself through living with a hermit, who helps him discover, ’The truth is everywhere yet so difficult to see.’ This time is delightfully told with philosophical questions posed.

His return home has surprises in store. Will his fiancé still be waiting for him? Does he want this sort of future? This book looks at life from a depressive’s stance, through to his overcoming this disability. It also looks at the effect of loss and loneliness on other characters in the story. We are left guessing how the story will resolve itself until the last page.

Martha Kennedy skillfully writes, whisking us back into a time of long ago.

http://marthakennedy.wordpress.com/2014/09/29/savior-is-for-sale/

May his memory live on:

 

I’d like to remember our wonderful Prime Minister Whitlam who died today. One of his thoughts corresponds with my own. It went something like:

‘I’m not immortal, I’m eternal.’

The man who tried to bring equality; introducing free education to universities, encouraging Australian generated Arts, amongst the many other egalitarian issues he broached.                    May this impressive man’s spirit live on.

 

At what age did you realize you were not immortal? How did you react to that discovery?

(Thank you for suggesting this prompt, Swoosieque)

 

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/finite-creatures/

 

 

Regional language:

Having discussed Australian regional differences in language before, I thought this article from The Guardian, might interest some of you, to show just a few variations. I’ve heard of American regional differences, does it happen in other countries too? I’m sure you’ll all have experienced this somewhere. My first awareness of differences was cantaloupe that we eat in Tasmania is called rockmelon in many other States.

http://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2014/oct/20/-sp-maps-of-australian-language-swimmers-v-cozzies-scallops-v-potato-cakes?CMP=twt_gu

Fantasy vs real life: Daily post

You get to spend a day inside your favourite movie. Tell us which one it is- and what happens to you while you are there.                                                                                   (Thanks to the lovely prompt idea Mywitchkitchen)

 I am torn between two simple movies, if I’m to share a part:

‘Fried Green Tomatoes and the Whistle Stop Café’ and ‘Enchanted April’.

In Fried Green Tomatoes, I’d probably choose to be the older woman looking back at her youth. The fact that she chooses to support her friend and remove her from a violent relationship brings justice. To cook the recalcitrant husband and serve him up to the policeman, appealed to me at the time.

The other film, ‘Enchanted April’, as the title suggests, brings together four women, discontented with their disparate lives, in the wet, cold weather of England. Together they escape to the Italian Riviera for a month’s holiday in a wonderful old castle, surrounded by beautiful over grown gardens. Of course I’d like to play the young woman who proposes this escapade. If you’d enjoy an Italian romantic holiday, it’s worth a look.

I wouldn’t want to mess about with the story lines, but live them as they are played out. Both of these stories share the importance of friendship and how it alters and expands their lives, giving of themselves they receive threefold.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/fourth-wall/

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