Category Archives: Paintings

Good read

Hopeful: book review

‘The Woman On The Stairs’ written by Bernhard Schlink is a charming book set in Germany involving creativity, love and hope.
Three men are all in love with the same woman and a painting of Irene is later the pivot that brings them together again.
Well worth a read.

<a href="http://Hopeful“>

Autumnal pursuits:

Christopher Pyett : ideas for paintings

Christopher Pyett : ideas for paintings

Autumn is a time for hunkering down. My daughter rang to say her gutters have been replaced and a dangerous chimney taken care of.
We’ve decided to remove two large palm trees that drop thousands of seeds and sprout everywhere. I love their height, but the other trees will soon fill the space left behind.

General garden maintenance is a fulfilling task. Removing spent tomato plants, culling the raspberries and tying the new canes makes the garden feel ready for winter. Pruning everything is something that needs to be rationed according to the recycling bins. We now have two brown bins, for garden waste that I don’t want to compost. Our six compost bins are fully utilized. So the garden is in need of constant attention, which fits in with writing.

I’d like to work half days at each, writing and gardening, so that I’m not sitting in front of the computer all day. This healthy option seldom works out, but I shall continue to aim for this ideal.

My computer is fine apart from the iphotos, which won’t allow me access. I shall really have to learn to use my new laptop, which is another thing I’ve been resisting. So for the moment, no photos of the garden.

Farewell:

Life has become very exciting. My beloved had an article written about himself and his work by Andrea Louise Thomas for a Mornington Peninsula paper called ‘Mint.’ This young woman, a poet, came into our lives like a hurricane. After much talk, we were encouraged to see the play, ‘Hamlet’, directed by Damien Ryan for the Bell Shakespeare Company. A really fresh approach was taken as a modern day thriller, with modern dress and a simple but magnificent set. This brought back memories of my student days.

Thursday I joined a Writing Skills workshop from 9.15-2.30 in Sandringham, an hour from where we live. The tutor, Claire Gaskin, is also a poet. Her class is inspirational. The group is full of keen writers of different genres, all willing to help one another. I had taken the first couple of chapters of my book, and with their input, I’m totally rewriting it! Besides rewriting, there is homework. Five questions, and then a 500-word short story. So this ten-week course is certainly helping me to refresh my ideas.

Thursday night we went to hear Rosie Batty, Australian of the Year, talk with Jon Faine, an ABC radio personality, in Mornington. Rosie was launching her book, ‘A Mother’s Story’, which I have read. It is inspiring to read and hear how she overcame so much and is continuing to work bringing family violence to the fore. Laws need to be changed and much has begun to change already.

Friday night Christopher had his painting in the Salon des Refuse´s, opening in Mornington. It was a big crowd and Rosie Batty opened the exhibition.

Mornington Gallery Photo: Susan Gordon-Brown

Mornington Gallery
Photo: Susan Gordon-Brown

This is the piece that I wrote for my writing class that had to start with, ‘And we’d been so clever,’ that links into the story above.

And we’d been so clever sitting in the second row, out of the limelight. The woman in the front row turned around and denounced my husband’s painting. ‘It’s a terrible painting. I ‘m familiar with Rosie Batty and that’s not her, she is such a strong woman. It’s a complete dirge, just look at it!’

My husband said, ‘That’s an old word.’

‘Yes, I’ve an understanding of words and I’m prepared to use them.’

My husband eggs her on some more,

‘Yes, she wears black glasses and here she’s wearing really light ones.’

The woman finding a ready audience really steamed ahead.

The speeches started and very soon Christopher is pointed out as the artist of the Rosie painting. The redness rose from her neck to her hairline in total embarrassment. She turned around to apologise at the end of the speeches, and Chris dismissed her, saying,

‘Don’t bother, I’m used to it,’ and walked off. It made our night seeing this haughty woman squirm.

Barbara, Christopher Pyett and Rosie Batty Mornington Gallery photo: Susan Gordon- Brown

Barbara, Christopher Pyett and Rosie Batty at Mornington Gallery with Rosie’s portrait
photo: Susan Gordon- Brown

The painting looks very light and doesn’t photograph well, but it has some amazing detail if closely examined. Chris found it a deeply spiritual experience painting Rosie.

This shall be my last post for some time. I have been having computer problems, and continue to have them. So I’m going to have to learn to use a new laptop. I am not sure if the number of e-mails has been choking my computer, so I am cutting off for the present. I shall miss you all, but am sure one day I’ll get this computer business sorted out.

Thank you all for being my friends from afar and I wish you all well with your writing and blogging. Adieu for the present!

 

‘A Perfect Drop’

Arch & Slab No.10

It has been a time of sorting, and some paintings that had hitherto been lost have been found.

The painting above was sold and I wanted to find a photo of it, and thought we’d lost it for good. Doing some cleaning up has been very rewarding. This painting was done after we’d been out to celebrate a birthday with a friend up at Dalesford, Victoria. The restaurant has since closed, but the memory of the small dishes to share were exquisite. I think the painting expresses our satisfaction of the meal and company perfectly.

‘Lost is the new found’

The prompt today is: click on your favourite blog, and pick out the 4th and 14th words(that aren’t ‘the’ or ‘an’). Drop them into this phrase.

“——- is the new ——.’ There’s your post title now write. Well I have adjusted a couple of things!

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/______-is-the-new-______/

 

 

Christopher Pyett

Barbara

Barbara, wife of artist, Christopher Pyett

I did say I’d show you this finished painting. Chris has experimented on this one using graphite, (pencil), gouache and water-colour.  He has now gone back to another he started of our daughter in law, Rachael.

We have the grand children staying, so I may be missing from the blogosphere for a bit. Happy holidays to those of you who are having school holidays!

Christopher Pyett’s portrait of Rosie:

Portrait of Rosie Batty by Christopher Pyett Photo: Susan Gordon Brown

Portrait of Rosie Batty, (Australian of the Year, and Domestic Violence Advocate), by Christopher Pyett. Medium: Water colour.
Photo: Susan Gordon Brown

 

Chris and Rosie 21-5-15

Chris and Rosie 21-5-15

Viewing the portrait before getting it framed.

Viewing the portrait before getting it framed.

It was wonderful to see Rosie today and to see her reaction to her reflective self. As you can see the portrait looks very different, colour-wise, in my photos to Susan Gordon Brown’s photo. Because it is very delicate and subtle it is difficult to photograph. The yellow is symbolic and was Rosie’s son’s favourite colour, and so is very meaningful to Rosie. Now we won’t know until July whether the portrait will be hung, but Chris is back to working on another couple of portraits.

Odds of getting into the Archibald Portrait Prize:

Getting hung at the Archibald, a prestigious Australian Art Portrait Prize, has always been tricky. There is now a website called, ‘What makes an Archibald Winner?’ by Tim Leslie, development by Simon Elvery and design by Ben Spragggon. If you are interested in finding out more about the Archibald, this site covers such things as: colour palette of previous winners, style, medium, subject’s occupation, subject gender, artist gender (81male/ 9 female), ethnicity, artist age, artist location, canvas size, aspect ratio. Here are two examples:

ARTIST AGE                                                                                                                                       The golden decade for winning the Archibald seems to be between 35 and 44; 40 per cent of winners fall within this demographic, and the most common winner is aged 35.

This year’s finalists line up fairly closely with the winners, with a third in the ideal range.

image002

 

 

 

 

 

The honour of being the oldest Archibald winner goes to John Olson, who was 77 when he won with a self portrait in 2005.

 

SUBJECT GENDER: While a painting featuring a woman won the Archibald just two years after its inception, only 13 winners in the past 93 years have been of women, and of those four were in the first decade.

image003

These comparisons are very interesting. It shows Chris, my husband, is up against the trend with his age being against him.  I do believe his choice of subject, Rosie Batty, is in his favour, and will hopefully help him to have his painting hung. Tension reigns in this house as the painting is in its final stages. Photographing, framing and organising transport are the easy bits. The entry forms are available from today, so there will be at least a thousand artists suffering the same dilemma. I shall not post a photo of the painting until we know if the painting gets chosen to be hung, or not. Rosie is delighted with it, as are we!

To try to answer the question set by WP for the prompt: Though I haven’t changed my view, I believe age should be an advantage to a painter, having practised for longer and gained maturity and experience. Having looked at the statistics of Archibald Prize winner’s chosen subjects to be 77 male to 13 female, it is time again for another woman to be held in high regard and given encouragement and applause; for her dedication to improve the lot of those who have been abused.

Flip Flop, by Michelle W.

Think of a topic or issue which you’ve switched your opinion. Why the change?

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/flip-flop/