Category Archives: Book/Film Review

Rosalie Blum: film review

 

Yesterday, being another hot day, the air-conditioning of the cinema tempted me to see a film I’d heard about.

 

‘Rosalie Blum’ is a delightful French film. Having actors who appeared normal rather than super stars is one of the reasons I love French cinema. They appear so believable and make it easier for me to relate to the story.

 

This story is set in a village in France. It starts with the character, Vincent, who has friends, but lives a lonely life. His mother is a manipulating person and it takes time for him to finally stand up to her. He becomes obsessed with Rosalie Blum, another lonely person.

That sounds pretty straight forward, but it isn’t that simple.

Rather than give away the plot, I’d love to hear from others who may have seen this thought provoking film.

 

<a href=”https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/tempted/”>Tempted</a>

Renewal

Renewal looks a strange word; it looks like three words in one.

I’m procrastinating…

If you are feeling your age, I’ve just read a book you might enjoy.

It is about a widow and widower who cross an invisible societal line in their small community. They feel that they’ve reached the age where they don’t care what others think.

‘Our Souls at Night’ is written by Kent Haruf. If you’re feeling you need to change your life in some way or just need a good read, this is the book for you. Haruf writes about two people in their seventies who find love and friendship with poignancy, charm and believability.

<a href=”https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/renewal/”>Renewal</a&gt;

Jack’s Present

This is a revised Christmas story written a few years ago.

Jack’s Present

Emily’s mum had helped her stir the special ingredients of oats and sparkling gold glitter and measured them into 15 envelopes.
On the front of each envelope were the instructions:

‘Sprinkle this reindeer food outside tonight.
The moonlight will make it sparkle bright.

Millie as a puppy

Millie as a puppy

As the reindeer fly and roam,
this will guide them to your home.’

Emily had signed each one ‘Love Emily’.
She proudly gave them to her friends at Day Care.
Jack put his away safely.

Jack and his brother, Mackenzie, watched Mum pack their case. Jack made sure that his envelope from Emily was in his bag. They were driving to their grandparents and Millie’s house for Christmas. Santa must know where to find them.

Christmas Eve, Jack and Mackenzie left out a bottle of beer and some biscuits for Santa. Then they sprinkled Jack’s reindeer food outside before hopping into bed to have a story.

Whilst the children slept, Millie, the puppy, thought the reindeer food was put out in the courtyard for her, so she ate it all up.

Luckily Santa still managed to find his way.

The next morning Jack and Mackenzie discovered their bulging stockings and ran to show their parents.

Everyone decided to take Millie for her walk before breakfast.

They had to wait while she searched for a special spot under a callistemon tree.

‘How come Millie’s poo is glittering?’ asked Jack.

‘Wow, you’re right,’ chuckled Grandpa, as he scooped it into a bag.

‘It’s her way of wishing everyone a happy Christmas!’

Mackenzie laughed. ‘Millie’s a clever dog!’

‘What a treat! But remember, my treasures,

all that glitters is not gold!’ said Grandpa.

Mackenzie and Jack

Mackenzie and Jack

‘Oddball’

Family Film: Oddball (G) Directed by Stuart McDonald

This Australian movie based on a true story was released in September this year and will appeal to every dog lover. Shane Jacobson plays a chicken farmer, Alan Swampy Marsh, and along with his dog, Oddball, his grand daughter, they bring this Australian drama to life. It is the compelling story of how Oddball, a Maremma dog is trained with a fairy penguin. There is a fight to save a fairy penguin colony from foxes and big business on an island off the Victorian coast, near Warnambool.

The good news is that the fairy penguin colony has grown; after getting down to 10, it has since increased to 150.

This feel good movie is full of kindness and I am responding to it by recommending it to you!

Pay It Forward, daily post by Ben Huberman

Tell us about a time when you responded to an act of kindness with one of your own.

 

https-//dailypost.wordpr#60BE76

Loneliness: a pre-review for the Daily Prompt Alternative

Today, I’ve decided to tell you about the library book I’ve just started reading. I wonder if any of you have read ‘The Wife’s tale’ by Lori Lansens? I hadn’t come across her writing before but apparently she has a best seller called, ‘the Girls.’

This story is about a woman who has suffered from being overweight for most of her life. She really captures the essence of this woman, Mary Gooch and the temptations of the Kelvinator, (refrigerator). I hope it doesn’t rub off, but I’m not tempted by ice cream in the middle of the night, at least not yet. This poor woman is waiting for her husband to come home, the night before their twenty fifth wedding anniversary.

There is a touch of sad humour when she reminisces about the doctor and her mother discussing her being obese, when she’s nine years old. She thinks the doctor means ‘Obeast’, in relation to witches and fairy tales. She believed there was a starving animal in her stomach.

The story explores loneliness and Mary Gooch finding herself. It is written well and the subject of neediness is a complex issue affecting many women. I would like to hear if you have read this book, and what you thought of it.Scan

This is my review for the daily prompt alternative, thanks myathiestblog
http://myatheistblog.com/2015/03/13/we-call-it-daily-but-really-its-whenever/

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/a-house-divided/

 

 

 

 

Mozart’s Magnificent Love letters: from Brain Pickings, a free weekly newsletter.

Mozart’s Magnificent Love Letter to His Wife
by Maria Popova
“If people could see into my heart I should almost feel ashamed.”

It’s hardly surprising that humanity’s most beautiful minds — the creative visionaries who bequeath us with the finest works of art, music, and literature — should also be the ones who author the most bewitching love letters, that highest form of what Virginia Woolf called “the humane art.” One particularly heartwarming specimen of the genre comes from Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756–December 5, 1791) — doubly so for the unusual start of the romance that would become the love of his life.

In late 1777, Mozart fell in love with Aloysia Weber — one of four daughters in a highly musical family. Despite the early cultivation of his talent, he was only just beginning to find self-actualization; she, on the other hand, was already a highly successful singer. (A century later, another great composer — Tchaikovsky — would tussle with the same challenge.) Despite her initial interest, Aloysia ultimately rejected his advances.

Over the next few years, Mozart established himself not only as the finest keyboard player in Vienna, but also as a promising young composer. When the father of the family died in 1782, the Webers began renting their house to lodgers to make ends meet. Young Mozart moved in, and soon fell in love with Constanze — the third Weber daughter.

On August 4, 1782, the two were married and remained together, very much in love, until Mozart’s death nine years later.mozart_constanze6

Shortly before his sudden death, in a letter from September of 1790 found in Love Letters of Great Men (public library) — a collection of romantic correspondence featuring Lord Byron, F. Scott Fitzgerald, James Joyce, Voltaire, Leo Tolstoy, and dozens more lovers of letters — Mozart writes to Constanze from Frankfurt, where he had gone seeking gainful employment to remedy the family’s financial downturn:

Dearest little Wife of my heart!

If only I had a letter from you, everything would be all right…

Dearest, I have no doubt that I shall get something going here, but it won’t be easy as you and some of our friends think. — It is true, I am known and respected here; but, well — No — let us just see what happens. — In any case, I do prefer to play it safe, that why I would like to conclude this deal with H… because I would get some money into my possession without having to pay any out; all I would have to do then is work, and I shall be only too happy to do that for my little wife.

After a getting a few more practical matters out of the way, Mozart fully surrenders to the poetical:

I get all excited like a child when I think about being with you again — If people could see into my heart I should almost feel ashamed. Everything is cold to me — ice-cold. — If you were here with me, maybe I would find the courtesies people are showing me more enjoyable, — but as it is, it’s all so empty — adieu — my dear — I am Forever

your Mozart who loves you
with his entire soul.

But even lovelier than the signature is the part that comes after it. Mozart violates in the most endearing of ways Lewis Carroll’s rule about postscript and writes:

PS. — while I was writing the last page, tear after tear fell on the paper. But I must cheer up — catch — An astonishing number of kisses are flying about — The deuce! — I see a whole crowd of them. Ha! Ha!… I have just caught three — They are delicious… I kiss you millions of times.

Book Review: ‘The Rosie Effect’, Graeme Simsion

 

Scan

⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

For those of you who have read, The Rosie Project, you will be thrilled to hear there is a follow on with The Rosie Effect, which is equally charming.

The main character, Don Tillman, a geneticist, is now married to Rosie Jarman, a medical student. Their lives are further changed by their move from Melbourne to New York. It is never explicitly divulged that Don has Asperger’s Syndrome, but his way of life is so unique, he can be nothing but. He learns how to deal with things, but in the process gets himself into some very difficult situations. The caring side of Don is so carefully crafted, and the funny incidents continue to amuse the reader.

Trying to protect his wife from stress, the web of deceit grows, leaving him in danger of losing his job, deportation, and worst of all, losing Rosie.

Difference is cherished throughout this story. For any of you who are, or have met anyone, on the autistic spectrum, you’ll love this book.

 

Paper Planes, the movie

Folding future: Ed Oxenbould as Dylan, an 11 yo. who discovers he has a knack with folding stuff in Paper Planes.

Folding future: Ed Oxenbould as Dylan, an 11 yo. who discovers he has a knack with folding stuff in Paper Planes.

 

Having grandchildren staying gave me the opportunity to see this new Australian movie, written, directed and produced by Robert Connolly.

This movie captures the imagination of children with its eleven-year-old Dylan, Ed Oxenbould, as the hero, succeeding against all the odds to participate in the Paper Plane World Championship. Dylan’s unassuming character shows his quiet strength coping with the enormous difficulties he’s facing.

The unique Western Australian landscape with its country school, gives a feeling of stepping back in time. Every emotion is tweaked.

I didn’t have high expectations, and yet the film was totally absorbing and left me feeling uplifted. Even if you don’t have children, it’s a delightful film to see.

Review: Dissection by Jacinta Halloran

Jacinta Halloran, a Melbourne GP, writes about Doctor Anna McBride with an authoritative voice. Life as a GP is usually considered pretty cushy, but this story allows one into the life of a busy mother, wife and doctor. When a delayed diagnosis brings about a lawsuit for medical negligence, Anna starts to doubt herself. Life becomes chaotic and she’s unable to fulfill the wishes of all of those depending on her. Her architect husband looks further afield as she’s unable to satisfy his needs.

This book is set in Melbourne, Australia, capturing city life in its complexity. It will resonate with anyone who has tried to juggle a job, home and family. I listened to the audio book, read beautifully by Jane Nolan, a well- known Australian actress.

Dissection was shortlisted for the 2007 Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards- Prize for an Unpublished Manuscript. Her next novel was published in August 2012, and is called, Pilgrimage. I shall be looking for it next time I go to the library.