Tag Archives: reading

Kindness:

The WordPress suggestion today is one I responded to before, so this time I shall tell you about the kindness of a special English teacher, Miss Street. Miss Street was a dedicated teacher and inspired me to have a pencil and paper by the bed, and a dictionary. As a consequence I’m constantly coming across words that either I’ve heard and not really understood, or are totally new. Reading constantly unfolds new ideas and words. I always remember this teacher when I write the words down.

Here are a just a few recent words:

Invoilably: that must not be violated, kept free from violence, or treated as if sacred.

Peripatetic: walking or travelling about, itinerant.

Malfeasance: the doing of an unlawful act.

Wordpost: The Kindness of Strangers, by Ben Huberman

When was the last time a stranger did something particularly kind, generous, or selfless for you? Tell us what happened!

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/the-kindness-of-strangers/

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Loneliness: a pre-review for the Daily Prompt Alternative

Today, I’ve decided to tell you about the library book I’ve just started reading. I wonder if any of you have read ‘The Wife’s tale’ by Lori Lansens? I hadn’t come across her writing before but apparently she has a best seller called, ‘the Girls.’

This story is about a woman who has suffered from being overweight for most of her life. She really captures the essence of this woman, Mary Gooch and the temptations of the Kelvinator, (refrigerator). I hope it doesn’t rub off, but I’m not tempted by ice cream in the middle of the night, at least not yet. This poor woman is waiting for her husband to come home, the night before their twenty fifth wedding anniversary.

There is a touch of sad humour when she reminisces about the doctor and her mother discussing her being obese, when she’s nine years old. She thinks the doctor means ‘Obeast’, in relation to witches and fairy tales. She believed there was a starving animal in her stomach.

The story explores loneliness and Mary Gooch finding herself. It is written well and the subject of neediness is a complex issue affecting many women. I would like to hear if you have read this book, and what you thought of it.Scan

This is my review for the daily prompt alternative, thanks myathiestblog
http://myatheistblog.com/2015/03/13/we-call-it-daily-but-really-its-whenever/

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/a-house-divided/

 

 

 

 

Book Review:

‘Collected Works of A. J. Fikry’ by Gabrielle Zevin, 2014

This small work of fiction captures the reader’s imagination with the closeness of a small community living on an island. Pivotal is the bookshop. Here we meet a widower, grieving for his wife who was killed in a road accident, until a miracle happens.

Grief, friendship and love are the main ingredients. The love of books permeates the whole story, bringing together the main characters. ‘The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society’ by Mary Ann Shaffer is of a similar ilk. Together they are delightful in their simplicity.

Sometimes I feel the need for an untroubling read before going to sleep. This fits the bill perfectly.

Our library is our pride and joy: daily prompt

My most precious thing, that fills me with most joy, is my library.

In fact it is our library. Religiously we go to the Hastings Library on the Mornington Peninsula where the friendly staff welcome us. It’s a small library by city standards. Books can be ordered from the bigger libraries, and the books get recycled between four libraries.

When I am not blogging, yes, I do have another life. Gardening, cooking, ironing, allow me to listen to audio books. Chris listens to stories as he paints. We are then able to discuss which ones we think are successful and why the others don’t come up to scratch.

We have discovered many genres previously unexplored. If we don’t like them we just start another. Popular choices are often crime fiction, from the gentle Donna Leon stories set in Venice, to popular Patricia Cornwell and many in between. Books of course are a separate bedtime activity. We read till we can’t keep our eyes open and allow the soporific effect to take us to an exciting dream world that we both fully participate in.

Without books our world would be quite colourless. (sorry, we Australians still like to use ‘u’ in some of our words).

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/pride-and-joy/

Genius and Rapture:

Going by train to the city has its advantages. As it takes a little over an hour each way, one is able to read. Today I started a book Janet, (an author/ teacher/ friend), lent me yesterday. Such friends are rare and precious!

What a delight to find such an interesting book. It is called ‘Dear Genius’, The letters of Ursula Nordstrom, collected and edited by Leonard S. Marcus. I wonder how many of you have read it?

Ursula Nordstrom, (UN), worked for Harper & Brothers, New York, for more than forty years. She became the first woman elected to the Board of Directors, Harper & Brothers in 1954. She was a most outspoken and caring editor in the Department of books for Boys and Girls for many years.

This is a quote to give you an idea of the sort of person she was:

“Asked pointedly by Anne Carroll Moore, the New York Public Library’s powerful superintendent of work with children, what qualified her, a non librarian, nonteacher, non-parent, and noncollege graduate to publish childrens’ books, Nordstrom just as pointedly replied, “Well, I am a former child, and I haven’t forgotten a thing.”

Her letters reveal her strength of character. It is exciting to hear of someone who would support writers she thought had talent, even during their difficult, non- productive times. I shall enjoy reading further…

Our trip to the city was to meet our new grand daughter, Hazel Elsa. Such perfection, and it makes one realize that miracles still happen. She was born yesterday and her new parents are understandably besotted, as are her numerous grandparents.

 

 

Review: ‘Winter Wish’ Dixie Minor

Dixie Minor’s Y/A book, ‘Winter Dream’, is set in the shadow of the north Georgia Mountains. The culture of a country town is reflected through the eyes of 18-year-old Jessie.

The loss of her mother at an early age permeates the story that encapsulates the uncertainties of youth.

Turmoil and dangers disrupt this peaceful town; combined with boy friend issues; suspense is maintained.

Jessie’s maturation is shown with her realization that she is not responsible for other people’s problems and happiness.

This book retains wholesome family values, without resorting to horror and terror. A welcome gift for any teenager. Dixie Minor is a fellow blogger and can be found at: http://www.dixieminor.wordpress.com

Fashion:

Do you find fashion affects your passion, be it writing, photography, painting, house improvements, clothing etc. etc.? It seems that everything is tainted by it.

For my February birthday, my dearest insisted on buying something in the city for my birthday. I can hear you say ‘how nice!’ Well, yes, it was. We were in Collingwood, a groovy part of the city of Melbourne. There was a beautiful red and purple jumper in the window that caught my eye. I could see, after my exclamation, that it was far too short, leaving the required bare mid-drift. In we went as my beloved wanted to buy me something special.

You have probably guessed, the shop was catering for the young people who live in the inner suburbs. I had to show willing by trying on a skirt and a dress. I loved the colours. The dress was very glamorous and looked far too elegant for my wants, these days. Gardening, visiting the library and an occasional lunch out, don’t warrant such glamour! So the skirt was tried on for a second time.

Yes, the greens and greys were acceptable. The materials were various patterns, cut on the bias in heavy cotton; the full skirt felt comfortable and swished nicely as I paraded in front of the mirror. The odd thing about this creation was an uneven hem line, un-hemmed, with tassels hanging down. When I inquired about said dangles, the lovely young assistant enthusiastically suggested; ‘Tie them up in the front, or the sides or you can have a bustle affect at the back, or tie them up all around!’

The lass was so kind and helpful, I didn’t have the heart to tell her what I thought. Cutting those dags off would be my first task getting home. Delighted that my beloved had found something for my birthday, he let me carry the trendy bag back to the car. Today I cut off the daggy frayed, very uneven bits; even having to add some material to two short sections, so the finished hem line was not above my knees. Getting the sewing machine out to zigzag the alterations was such an effort, before ironing, ready to hem by hand tonight. It made me wonder how anyone could place a garment ready for sale with out finishing it (in my mind).  Costing $220, unfinished, does anyone else think this is ridiculous?

I’d like to hear how you have been affected by fashion.