Time away:

Three nights away and I feel a different person. Celebrating my aunt’s 90th birthday was a treat. She is the last of my mother’s sisters. Mary holds herself so straight; always dressing in such a dignified manner, she’s an inspiration. Her health hasn’t always been good, and yet her complaints are kept to herself. I wonder to myself, will I be as stoic?

View from fire lit D'Anvers restaurant with delicious hot chocolates.

View from fire lit D’Anvers restaurant with delicious hot chocolates.

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Mary

My aunt’s cousin, Jane, (80, previous winner of the Australian Seniors’ Golf Championship), took us for some wonderful drives. On arrival we had afternoon tea at the House of Anvers, a boutique chocolate factory/ restaurant at Latrobe.

Jane

Jane

 

 

 

Lunch on the birthday was at La Mar at Turners Beach. Totally delicious fare of fish and chips, cooked just right.

Up behind Devonport there are places called No Where Else and Paradise. Places such as these had their signs removed during the war to confuse the enemy, in case they were invaded. I’m sure with the signs any enemy would have been none the wiser! The Forth Valley is mostly farming, with such vegetables as: beans, broccoli, onions, leeks celery, swedes, potatoes, cabbage, cauliflower, lettuce and pumpkin.

Glencoe, B&B

Glencoe, B&B

B&Bs are scattered, this taken out of the moving car, shows a sign for one of these where there is a famous French chef. They grow their own produce and the food is exquisite.

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Poppy growing

 

 

Tasmania is the only Southern Hemisphere location where poppies are grown for the production of morphine, codeine and thebaine. Victoria has been threatening to start competing in this area, but Tasmanians are hoping to retain their monopoly.

 

Of course the conversation always wanders down memory lane, and my aunt’s long- term memory is in full swing.

Deloraine was where we met up with my mother’s only brother, Henry, (92) and his wife Anne. Eating out, my aunts, cousin and uncle are recognized wherever we go. Tasmania is such a friendly island with so many links.

Henry

Henry

 

Afterwards we went into the rural countryside behind Deloraine. (In the middle of no –where, where the search for the Tasmanian tiger still goes on). Here, there is now a place called 41degrees South where they farm salmon and grow ginseng, producing gourmet products with free tastings. Returning to the Highway we went to a place called the Creamery where they make ices of every description, dairy free! They were like the Italian gelati with a wide range of flavours. There too, of course, someone knew someone, and more discussions ensued in the Tasmanian way.

The rows of poplar trees were all golden and glowed in the sunshine with the blue of the mountain as a backdrop.

We didn’t stop at the cheese factory this time. The whole of Tasmania is catering to tourists and niche industries have struck up all over the island. It is certainly a place I’d recommend for a holiday, no matter what your interests are. Many artists and writers have settled in Tasmania as it retains a fresh and unspoilt feel.

 

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19 thoughts on “Time away:

  1. ChristineR

    Tasmania would have changed a lot since I spent a week there in January 1990. It’s hard to believe that’s all of 25 years ago … a quarter of a century! We did the touristy things – Port Arthur, Cradle Lake, Richmond Bridge, glow worm caves, boat ride on the Gordon River.. . magnificent scenery everywhere we looked and friendly people.

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    1. bkpyett Post author

      Still the friendly people, and the services have improved greatly Christine. Certainly in Feb/ March/ April is an ideal time to visit. I love the milder temperatures and don’t mind it year around! If the children hadn’t settled on the mainland, we would have retired there. Though Victoria is a pretty good state too!

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    1. bkpyett Post author

      Due to unemployment, a lot of the young ones have to go to the mainland for work. The tourist industry is in full swing though, and Tasmania makes a lot of its cottage industries, such as unique cheeses. It did win an international prize for its whiskey and gin too!

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      1. Outlier Babe

        The more I hear, the more surprising. I am sure most Americans don’t think “specialty cheeses” when they hear “Tasmania”. If we picture anything at all, it’s likely something along the lines of the Wilds of Borneo–not geographically (as if Americans have any geographical knowledge–hah!!), but untamed-wildernessically.
        😉

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Cynthia Jobin

    Tasmania is all new to me, so I thoroughly enjoyed your nice little tour and thank you for giving me what is beginning to be a “feel” for the place. If I were younger I would be most tempted to go….

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  3. auntyuta

    Three nights away in Tasmania. Sounds wonderful. It is great how you celebrated your aunt’s 90th birthday. Thanks for sharing. I loved to hear about all the things that are grown in Tasmania. I loved all the pictures too. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  4. gerard oosterman

    A good time to be had by all. You certainly have longevity in your genes Barbara. I did the walk Cradle- Back Mountain to Lake StClaire many years ago. It was hard going but very beautiful, Climbed a mountain in between. Was it called The Acropolis?

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. bkpyett Post author

      Yes, the Acropolis Mountain is apparently the 14th highest in Tasmania. You did well to climb that as well as walk through the Reserve Gerard!

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