Blessings:

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Looking back over the holiday period makes me very grateful for what we have and the family we share.

The Sunday before Christmas we had Christopher’s boys and their families. Will and Rachael are now foster parents. They brought their son and a foster boy with them to share our special day. At present this child is only having respite time with them as his mother is waiting for a placement in a drug rehabilitation centre. Ice is a particularly nasty drug, which is far more addictive than other drugs, and is rampant in Victoria, as it is probably everywhere else. It is hard to imagine what it is like for an only child to live in this environment.

L. appeared happy to be with us and joined in the conversation. Since joining his foster parents he’s experienced many things for the first time. Going to the beach, to the cinema and many family activities that we take for granted.

Conversation at the lunch table was interesting. L is obsessed with the army and army activities. Someone at school had convinced him that ISIS has nothing to do with terrorism. He asked each of us what we thought, but our thoughts didn’t deter him, even though he couldn’t remember the reasoning behind his friend’s comment. Rachael calmly suggested that since he couldn’t remember the reason, perhaps he needed to reconsider this information.

I thought how easily a child can be led astray. Hopefully listening to a group of adults with different views from his own, will give him pause to reconsider his way out views.

 

Daughters in law with naughty Grandpa and youngest grandchild.

Daughters in law with naughty Grandpa and youngest grandchild.

The meal was a great success, always a relief for me when it all comes together. Many of the vegetables were new to L. and so it was rewarding to see him tasting and liking them. Roast pork turned out to be a favourite.

Playing cricket in the street was fun, apart from my beloved tearing a tendon when he was trying to bowl a googly. He was surprised that his body didn’t respond as it did forty years ago. He ended up fielding with Millie by his side, who delighted in catching the balls that came their way.

We were thrilled at the end of the day when L. announced he’d never had such a wonderful Christmas, it made it all so worthwhile. It also made me sad to think of how many children there must be out there who would be not celebrating, as we were able to do. Christmas isn’t always a happy time for people, so it makes me more appreciative than ever, that we’re able to share with a family we love.

Some good news announced today, 2-1-15: Collingwood, the largest Australian Rules Football Club announced that it has donated 30 homes to the Salvation Army to house those less fortunate. This means 80 people are now benefitting from this generous gift. Collingwood Football Club propose to donate another 70 homes this year. What a wonderful, generous way to start the year. Congratulations to all of those involved.

 

 

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19 thoughts on “Blessings:

  1. auntyuta

    “Some good news announced today, 2-1-15: Collingwood, the largest Australian Rules Football Club announced that it has donated 30 homes to the Salvation Army to house those less fortunate. This means 80 people are now benefitting from this generous gift. Collingwood Football Club propose to donate another 70 homes this year. What a wonderful, generous way to start the year. Congratulations to all of those involved.”

    I glanced at this and think it is a terrific idea. Why cannot governments keep up with doing similar things?

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    1. bkpyett Post author

      Fancy you finding this post Aunty Uta! I was pleased to see you wrote more seriously about the generous gifts of Collingwood to our society today. If only our government would entertain some plain common sense!

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  2. Zambian Lady

    What a nice side of your story that L had the best Christmas. I hope he has many more loving experiences. There are a lot of sad stories around, so what you, Will and Rachel are doing for vulnerable people lifts one’s spirits.

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  3. Unreqwrited

    It is wonderful that L has been given a Christmas to remember and I would say he is also bringing things to teach us to remember in return. I hope he has the fortitude to make his way through the labyrinth of life without being too damaged. Since this post is about blessings, not messings, I’ll save my rant about the terrorism relabelling issue for another day. Wishing you many Blessings to you and yours ❤

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  4. Outlier Babe

    Barbara, I don’t know how old L. is, but the Socratic method is such a winning tool at teaching children to think–about anything, but particularly about moral issues–and there is also the very important need to establish a common vocabulary.

    “You could be right, L. May I ask some questions to clarify, so that I understand what your friend meant?
    First of all, how would you define ‘terrorism’? What do you think a ‘terrorist’ is, or what do you think she or he does?” (Kanzensakura’s definition of a terrorist as “hate in motion” is perfect, isn’t it?)

    My guess is that L. would need some help here, and one would have to tread carefully so as not to embarrass him, or challenge him and cause him to become defensive. So if he hesitates:

    “Would you say a terrorist causes terror–frightens people–to get what she or he wants?”
    and
    “Have you heard about terrorists kidnapping people to get what they want? Killing people if governments don’t give in and give them what they want?”

    You see what’s coming, Barbara. You walk the student to her/his own forgone conclusion. In this case, that ISIS does those evil things that terrorists do. If it slithers like a snake…

    Will and Rachel are doing a marvelous thing. And no matter what happens down the road in L.’s life, your family gave an oasis of joy to that poor child.

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    1. bkpyett Post author

      I think Rachael deals well with these issues as she is a psychologist and councillor. I haven’t had a chance to talk further with her as they are away on holiday. L. Is 11, but very big for his age. I have a feeling that he’s on the higher end of the autistic spectrum. Clever in some ways, but socially inadequate in others.
      Thanks for your helpful suggestions, I can see you would be good at dealing with situations like this. I have every confidence in R and W too, they are very dedicated.
      Yes, ‘hate in motion’ is a strong definition of terrorism.
      I do appreciate the time you took to answer this post. 😊

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      1. Outlier Babe

        The Aspie with few friends and two children who don’t speak to her has the–audacity is far to mild a word, but it will have to do–to LECTURE to the woman with a happy, loving, emotionally-healthy family about how to handle one child’s question. That you answered so gently, rather than shouting “How dare you butt in unasked and imply my family NEEDS your child-rearing advice?!” is more than I deserved. Of course, I did not miss that your comment about L’s possible spectrum characteristic (“socially inadequate”) applied as well to me.

        My deepest apologies, Barbara. I’d say I won’t do the like again, but sadly, I’m Aspie still, and likely will. I can say I will try.

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      2. bkpyett Post author

        My dear Outlier Babe, I would never take offence at your really helpful advice. Your writing is brilliant and I really enjoy and feel privileged to be able to read what you have to say. I wouldn’t have picked that you are an ‘Aspie’, as you put it. You manage it well. Have you read Graeme Simsion’s ‘The Rosie Project’ and the recent ‘The Rosie Effect?’ The protagonist is an Aspie, but it isn’t spelled out, it is just about his life and how he manages it. Really funny, especially when you know how close to the truth this is! I’ve just started the second book and am really enjoying seeing how he is coping with marriage. The author is from Melbourne, so it is a thrill to see how his books have travelled the world! Let me know what you think, if you manage to read one or two, please! 🙂

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  5. kaytisweetlandrasmussen83

    It is frightening indeed to learn what our young people are being exposed to. The terrorism brainwashing is so unbelievable isn’t it? The drugs are everywhere whether they go by ICE or crystal meth, and whether smoked, snorted or injected. These young minds are being rewired before they have a chance to mature. The worst part is that they are being ;captured at such early ages.

    How nice you and your family were able to introduce the boy to a normal family holiday. He will never forget it. Happy New Year.

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  6. kanzensakura

    Sad to say, we’ve had complaints from parents about teachers in a middle school in the city, teaching that terrorism does not exis, that is only peoples’ state of mind, that is terrorism and hate that is terrotism. Duh, what do the idiots think terrorism is but hate in motion? Action was take but the teachers claim it is only because they are a racial minorith, not true. You just have to wonder also about adults with the peer group syndrome. The gathering looks lovely and all afe having fun. It is a happy time.

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    1. bkpyett Post author

      Yes, I couldn’t take the whole group, for obvious reasons. That is not good to hear that children are being told terrorism doesn’t exist. Crazy! Though I think we all wish for a more peaceful world.

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  7. bkpyett Post author

    Not being a fan, I’m impressed!
    This conversation was quite an eye opener. I’m just hoping a change of scene helps L. see things differently. Having heard about the Queensland mum on ice who killed 8 children, gives one pause for thought too!!

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  8. la_lasciata

    Eddie’s a canny bastard, alright ! [grin] Seriously, regardless of the general loathing of the ‘Pies, it’s a wonderful thing, Ba.
    As for your story of the boy’s inculcation at school – that says everything about the peer group syndrome of today, don’t you think …? It’s frighteningly powerful …

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