Regional language:

Having discussed Australian regional differences in language before, I thought this article from The Guardian, might interest some of you, to show just a few variations. I’ve heard of American regional differences, does it happen in other countries too? I’m sure you’ll all have experienced this somewhere. My first awareness of differences was cantaloupe that we eat in Tasmania is called rockmelon in many other States.

http://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2014/oct/20/-sp-maps-of-australian-language-swimmers-v-cozzies-scallops-v-potato-cakes?CMP=twt_gu

Advertisements

19 thoughts on “Regional language:

  1. ChristineR

    I seem to remember bathers for us girls and trunks for the boys when we wern’t calling them togs. I grew up in the vincinity of the Victorian and South Australian border. Potato cakes (but pineapple fritters), going to the pictures, short a, rockmelon, rubbish bin, both fritz and German sausage, case. Thanks for link, Barbara. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  2. bmpermie

    Thanks for that Barbara as I had missed the Guardian article. It was a shock to hear the word ‘bathers’ while I was in Adelaide recently. I recall having to school myself not to use it when I moved from Hobart to Sydney in the 1970s.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  3. Silver in the Barn

    Barbara, bubbler vs. water fountain? This caused such confusion to my American Midwest family when we moved to New England: they called a water fountain a “bubbler.” The only place in the US to do so. Now we live down South which has its unique dialects and terms as well. So many of them, in fact, that it is worthy of a post!

    I studied Mandarin for a year and was constantly being told by my instructor that this is what we say In Taiwan but in Beijing they say this. Egad, like the language isn’t hard enough as it is. And growing up in Germany, my grandfather would tease my grandmother over her schwabian accent….not proper High German.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. bkpyett Post author

      Barbara, great to hear your experiences in America and in Mandarin! Bravo for broaching that difficult language! I experienced the Swiss didn’t like High German, and would answer me in English when I attempted to speak German. Swiss German is an unwritten language, so is picked up by listening…

      Like

      Reply
    1. bkpyett Post author

      Irene, where did you grow up? We called it ‘going to the pictures’ too, in Tasmania. I have heard of a water fountain, but i’ve forgotten which State, having lived in a few.

      Like

      Reply
      1. bkpyett Post author

        Thanks Irene, that puts things in context! You are probably right about drinking fountain.
        We have an American and a Canadian in our family now!

        Like

      1. M-R

        I believe they use both terms here in Sidder-Knee; but I can’t say for sure, seein as how I don’t hold conversations with Sydneysiders who go swimming ! πŸ˜€

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Master of Something Yet

    You can always trust the Queenslanders to do things their own way. And whoever it was in Geelong who called them ‘togs’ is an impostor. It’s ‘bathers’, thank you very much.
    PS Really didn’t need that image in my face when I first clicked through. *shudder*

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s