An old letter:

 

letter written in the 1920s from Brenda, (my mother), to her mother.

letter written in the 1920s from Brenda, (my mother), to her mother.

reverse side or letter

reverse side or letter

 

This letter was discovered after my mother’s death. It describes her train journey, and seeing a Chinese lady with her crying daughter. Obviously pants were not commonly worn in those days! Letter writing was encouraged at an early age.

Spelling was obviously something to be learnt! (Using ink and getting blots; I remember getting 4/10 for writing, as I was left handed too, and blots were a total no no). It sounds as if Brenda was with Lillian and Chloris, as they don’t get a mention at the end of the letter. They must have had a wonderful time with their grandparents in Hobart. It was a days journey by train from Devonport to Hobart at that time.

 

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15 thoughts on “An old letter:

    1. bkpyett Post author

      My father seldom wrote, and so a couple of his letters I gave to my children. My mother wrote at least once a week and unfortunately I destroyed all of hers… I’m glad you have kept your father’s. My father’s script was copperplate, and very beautiful and thoughtful. πŸ™‚

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  1. avian101

    Reading the original letter is fantastic, part of the story comes directly “from the horse’s mouth” as they say. Thanks for another nice chapter Barbara! πŸ™‚

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    1. bkpyett Post author

      These are even more precious, as I destroyed all of my letters and diaries on a large bonfire before I left Canberra. Yes, there’s a freshness about the originals! Thanks for your comment HJ. πŸ™‚

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  2. fightingfatblogger

    How lovely! There is something special about the handwriting of a loved one, I am the only one of my siblings ever to receive letters from my father (because I was the only one who moved away and wrote to him) and I love those letters, not just because they were from him but I just love to see his handwriting, something he did that’s till here.

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  3. bkpyett Post author

    Apricots and mulberries! I shall post another she sent to her father some time too.
    Her grandfather was an MP. Thanks for your comment! πŸ™‚

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  4. bmpermie

    I remember that train trip on The Tasman Limited, sadly no more. Chinese ladies were not so common then in Tasmania so I can imagine she was wearing Chinese style pants and jacket which could be purchased in my day at the Peking Gift Store in Liverpool St Hobart. Everything in that shop looked very exotic.

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    1. bkpyett Post author

      Yes, I remember that trip on the Tasman Ltd. I think Mum did see a Chinese lady, but there wouldn’t have been many about. Pants for women weren’t seen often in those days. πŸ™‚

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  5. M-R

    Brilliant, Ba ! – that letter must be a bit fragile by now, some danger of corners breaking ..? I particularly like “enenthing” !!! πŸ˜€ My little sister once wrote me a card starting out “Dear Margie;:
    D E R M U G E
    Get it ? After that I was referred to as “Der Muge” (pronounced as is) for a very long time. [grin]

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    1. bkpyett Post author

      Yes it is fragile M-R, so I thought at least it’s getting an airing! I loved your little sister’s Der Muge! That is so sweet. I can remember teasing my youngest brother because he spelt Snoopy, Snoppy. ❀ Mean older sister…

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