Language changes:

Verbal Ticks: Is there a word or a phrase you use (or over use) all the time and are seemingly unable to get rid of it? If not, what’s the one that drives you crazy when others use it? Ben Huberman

The second half of this question interests me, but I can’t be content with only the singular. Language is a changing thing, as we all know. It is the fashionable over use of some words/terms that particularly irritate.

Beginning with ‘Fantastic!’ or ‘Absolutely fantastic!’, or just ‘Absolutely!’. My beloved thinks this is waning, and he’s a media buff, so he usually has his finger on the pulse. Instead, people are replying to questions with ‘Look’.

There are the ‘going forward’, and ‘at this time’ phrases that are fill ins, allowing people time to think, perhaps? The one that really irritates is, ‘I. myself. personally’ with its many variations.

In Australia each State has its own language variations. For instance: in Queensland when I lived there in the 80s ‘but’ was common at the end of a sentence.

In Tasmania where I grew up, we would say: ‘at the weekend’.                                                     In Victoria and other States it is ‘on the weekend’.                                                            ‘Cantaloupe’ (the fruit) in Tasmania is called ‘Rock melon’ in NSW.                                                The list could go on. I wonder if in other countries you have different words, for the same thing, in different areas?

Do any of the ‘in’ words irritate any of you, as they do me? I’m sure you all have your own pet hates!

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/verbal-ticks/

 

 

 

Advertisements

18 thoughts on “Language changes:

  1. bkpyett Post author

    Having read Sol Stein, I too have been going through my ms removing adverbs, it is interesting how much stronger the writing appears without these unnecessary words…. is it fashion?

    Like

    Reply
  2. hilarycustancegreen

    It’s the first of Huberman’s thoughts that interest me. I have to go through my manuscripts removing ‘just’, ‘simply’ and ‘really’. Then I have to run through again and remove the ‘simply’ that I substituted for a ‘just’ and the ‘really’ that I substituted for a ‘simply’… you get the picture. Mostly, now, I just, simply delete.

    Like

    Reply
  3. Dixie Minor

    I do use “amazing” even though it annoys me sometimes! It is a good word!! 😊 I just don’t use it all the time,but I use other words too much instead! Ah well. . .

    Like

    Reply
  4. Elaine @ foodbod

    Oops, I’m guilty of responding the comments with just ‘absolutely’!!
    What drives me nuts is when people pepper their conversation with ‘obviously’ – why? Is it what you’re saying obvious??? But I don’t think people realise when they’d the things plus I’m someone that can get irritated by peoples misuse of language!!

    Like

    Reply
    1. bkpyett Post author

      Obviously or really? Both get extra use! There are so many words that have come into our vernacular: for instance, ‘like’, in Australia, gets used unnecessarily.I find it fascinating, though I use these terms too from time to time….

      Like

      Reply
  5. bkpyett Post author

    Thanks Martha, it is good to know you have normal and abnormal in your country too! Did you see the video I reblogged, I think it might take your fancy. (as a teacher of literature) 🙂

    Like

    Reply
  6. Martha Kennedy

    There is a wide variety of tonal and vocabulary differences in the United States — just a few: FRENCH bread (east coast) French BREAD (normal people from where I am from). In line (normal people) ON line (weirdos from other parts of the country, clearly more regimented than the far west). Pop (Coke, 7-Up etc. normal people from where I’m from) soda, all other people who are peculiar because they’re not like me 😉 .

    Like

    Reply
  7. bkpyett Post author

    Helen, I use them too! As I mentioned to Dixie above, I’ve reblogged a u-tube video which is well worth watching, if you have time. 🙂

    Like

    Reply
  8. Dixie Minor

    Great post, Barbara! I think the word “amazing” is overused right now, but I get that words that the number of words that show that something is really special seem to be limited! I always fish for them myself and come up using “wonderful” too often-but for some reason, “amazing” irritates me in its overuse! I, myself, personally overuse “wonderful.” Hahaha. 😄 (little joke) In many parts of the South, in America, and definitely in Atlanta, we say “Coke” for any soft drink; in other parts of the country, the drink may be soda or pop. I had never known what Rock melon was; love it though! 😊

    Like

    Reply
    1. bkpyett Post author

      After reading some of the other posts, I realise just how many words that I’ve missed out on including. Have just reblogged one, with a utube video about ‘Fuck’, please watch, is excellent!

      Like

      Reply
  9. M-R

    And Stringer and I were horribly guilty of adding ‘but’ to the ends of sentences – nothing to do with being banana-benders (M-R=sandgroper and CS=mexican) but simply because it amused us enormously ! Tsk …

    Like

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s