St. Lillian, Brenda and Mary

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Chloris (died at 21) Lillian, Brenda, Front: Henry and Mary (taken 1920s?)

In 300 years, if you were to be named the patron saint of x, what would you like x to be? Place, activities, objects – all are fair game.  Ben Huberman.

This time I’d like to remember my aunt who died this week at the age of 97. She always appeared dignified and saintly. She was my Mother’s sister. Lillian was married to a Baptist minister and so she moved about, which meant meeting new people. This didn’t come easily to her, though she tried vigilantly to mix and be the perfect mother and minister’s wife.

Staying with this family when I was young, I do remember being reprimanded for calling my uncle a parsnip. (Close to parson, I thought). My older brother had the wooden spoon broken on his leg when he misbehaved. Later when they moved to Adelaide, their younger son was found on the front verandah of the Manse with their neighbour, a little girl, both nude and covered in texta. Lillian took them inside and popped them in the bath and tried to remove the incriminating evidence. It was no laughing matter.

Lillian’s saintliness was her dedication to communication. She wrote every week to her parents and siblings. Later, I became part of this ritual. Birthdays were always remembered and she’d knit jumpers for our off spring. My children remember her with great affection.

Having considered Lillian for a Saint-hood, I think her sisters would also qualify. Mary the youngest remains positive at 89 and has enjoyed being a grandmother to eight grandchildren who all adored her. Meeting up is always such an uplifting experience. Her life has been one of service and dedication to family.

My Mother died at the age of 84. She didn’t want to be a burden and would have hated being dependent. Her life, too, was one dedicated to family and service to the community. She was a people person and at her funeral I heard all sorts of stories about the people she had helped. The church over flowed with people that loved her. She would have loved to know that the same week her sister died she had a new great grand son. Perhaps she does!

St. Brenda will be there to welcome St. Lillian, and they’ll eventually be there for their youngest sister, St. Mary. Their lives were unacknowledged in the larger scheme of things, but they will remain saints to me.

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/leaving-legacy/

 

 

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10 thoughts on “St. Lillian, Brenda and Mary

  1. joannesisco

    What a lovely tribute to women who touched your life! We rarely know how the small ripples we create in our life affect others around us and yet we often feel the ripples from other people very deeply.

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  2. simon682

    My mother was one of four sisters who I think of as the four great matriarchs of the family. I wouldn’t want to get on the wrong side of any of them but there was a saintly side too. Only Bunt left but she was always the most likely candidate for canonisation.

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    1. bkpyett Post author

      Lovely to hear of your matriarchs Simon. Mine were very strong women and their Mother was even stronger, a widow for decades, and had her daughters running around at her bidding. Scary!

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  3. ChristineR

    And these wonderful people would say they were only doing their job, too. In the olden days we had so many aunts and uncles to go around and lots of cousins. These days, with smaller families there is less love to spread, so we must be sure to appreciate it while we have it and do our share. My auntie Joan sprang to mind as soon as I read your lovely post, but she can’t have a sainthood yet as she is still alive. 🙂

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    1. bkpyett Post author

      I do think these people went beyond doing just their job. Spreading love was certainly part of life. As you say, families are becoming separated and probably more stressed. I do believe that positive thoughts help, connecting somewhere in the universe and ultimately helping. I like to think so, anyway! 🙂 thanks Christine!

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  4. Martha Kennedy

    I love this. My mother’s sisters Jo and Martha and my grandmother (dad’s mom) are my personal saints, not that I pray to them but I don’t think a day goes by in my life that I don’t express some gratitude for their having loved me each in her own very important way. Beautiful post.

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    1. bkpyett Post author

      I do agree. My mother was a wonder and received no public recognition. It makes me disappointed to see so many get awards who have been doing only what they get paid to do.

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